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Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

8 edition of Cuba in the American imagination found in the catalog.

Cuba in the American imagination

Louis A. PГ©rez

Cuba in the American imagination

metaphor and the imperial ethos

by Louis A. PГ©rez

  • 183 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by University of North Carolina Press in Chapel Hill .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Metaphor -- Political aspects -- United States -- History,
  • Imperialism -- History,
  • Popular culture -- United States -- History -- 19th century,
  • Popular culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century,
  • Political culture -- United States -- History -- 19th century,
  • Political culture -- United States -- History -- 20th century,
  • Public opinion -- United States -- History,
  • United States -- Relations -- Cuba,
  • Cuba -- Relations -- United States,
  • Cuba -- Foreign public opinion, American

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementby Louis A. Pérez, Jr.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE183.8.C9 P4653 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16426271M
    ISBN 109780807832165
    LC Control Number2008000078

    From the acclaimed poet and critic, an affectionate examination of Cuba in America’s cultural imagination Cuba, an island miles long, with a population of about 11 million, lies less than miles off the U.S. coast. Yet the island’s influences on America’s cultural imagination are extensive and deeply ingrained. Close mobile search navigation. Article navigation. Vol Issue 1Author: Claire F. Fox.

    Buy Cuba in the American Imagination by Louis A. Perez from Waterstones today! Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £ It’s an account of American influence in Cuba, with a special focus on the years when the country was a hangout for organized crime. The book is fascinating and reads like a novel with a cast of.

    Ma Word Count: words Louis A. Pérez, Jr. Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, Pp. xxi + $ (cloth), ISBN Reviewed by: Gabriella Silva Review- Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos Louis A. Pérez Jr., a scholar and expert historian of the.   Rachel Kushner’s debut novel Telex From Cuba (Scribner), which garnered her a National Book Award, is set in an American community in a Cuba that is on the verge. It is , the Castro Brothers are successfully fomenting change, and this story’s two young protagonists, residing on United Fruit’s fiefdom in Oriente province (where the.


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Cuba in the American imagination by Louis A. PГ©rez Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cuba in the American Imagination is a timely addition to Cuba in the American imagination book magisterial oeuvreAmy Kaplan, University of Pennsylvania From its intervention in Cuba's war of independence from Spain to the naming of a 'transition coordinator' for the post-Castro period, the United States has long reacted to Cuba as a neuralgic by: 4.

Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos. For more than two hundred years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images--Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride a bicycle/5(4).

Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos (Caravan Book) - Kindle edition by Perez, Louis A., Jr. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos (Caravan Book).5/5(3). Cuba in the American Imagination Book Description: For more than two hundred years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images--Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride a bicycle.

In Cuba and the American Imagination, Louis A. Perez Jr. adds to his impressive oeuvre on US-Cuba relations in the twentieth century Compelling As the potential for change and dialogue between the United States and Cuba appears viable for the first time in decades, Perez's study remains prescientPrice: $ He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the author of many award-winning books, including On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality, and Culture and To Die in Cuba: Suicide and Society (both from the University of North Carolina Press).

Cuba in the American Imagination.: For more than two hundred years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images--Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride a bicycle.1/5(1).

For more than two hundred years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images--Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride a by: Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos.

Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. xii, Jr. has dedicated a good part of his prolific scholarship to the study of the complex effects of North American imperial policies in Cuba. This book expands on this long-term interest, but from a different angle.

Cuba in the American Imagination 作者: Louis A. Pérez 出版社: The University of North Carolina Press 副标题: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos 出版年: 页数: 定价: USD 装帧: Hardcover ISBN: In a nutshell. Cuba in the American Imagination examines the emergence of the idea of Cuba in the United States from the early nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth.

The book attends to the ways that Americans deployed metaphor and figurative depiction as the principal discursive mode, by which knowledge of Cuba entered the mainstream political culture and popular conventions. Cuba seized hold of the North American imagination early in the nineteenth century.

What made awareness of Cuba particularly significant were the ways that it acted on the formation of the American consciousness of nationhood. The destiny of the nation seemed inextricably bound.

Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary This title presents the images of beneficence, acts of more than two hundred often turbulent years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images - Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride a bicycle.

The author now argues in Cuba in the American Imagination that metaphors of Cuba legitimated U.S. power by articulating a moral imperative that compelled Americans to dominate the island for their self-interest while pretending to do so selflessly for Cuba’s benefit.

From the day Americans imagined Cuba “at our very door” or as a “ripe Author: Alan McPherson. Get this from a library. Cuba in the American imagination: metaphor and the imperial ethos. [Louis A Pérez, Jr.] -- "For more than two hundred often turbulent years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images - Cuba.

Louis A. Perez, Jr. On his book Cuba in the American Imagination: Metaphor and the Imperial Ethos Cover Interview of Ma The wide angle. The premise of American nationhood in the nineteenth century was fully imbued with the presumption of possession of Cuba. The island insinuated itself into the American sense of nation, and indeed.

This week, President Obama announced that he will begin to normalize relations with Cuba. Cuban-American writer Richard Blanco recommends a book about Cuba's imprint on the American imagination. For more than two hundred often turbulent years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images--Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride.

Check out this great listen on For more than often turbulent years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images - Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride a bicycle. Rock 'n' roll, zombies, drugs – anomie and angst – do not generally figure in our mental images of a country that's assumed an outsized place in the American imagination.

But fresh from the tropics, in Cuba in Splinters – a sparkling package of stories we're assured are fictional – that's exactly what you'll find.

Eleven writers largely unknown outside Cuba depict a world that veers. For more than two hundred years, Americans have imagined and described Cuba and its relationship to the United States by conjuring up a variety of striking images—Cuba as a woman, a neighbor, a ripe fruit, a child learning to ride a bicycle.

Louis.In Cuba in the American Imagination, Louis A. Pérez Jr. forwards Cuba as an indispensable element of U.S. nation over reams of writings and caricatures by U.S. statesmen, officials, and opinion makers since the early nineteenth century, Pérez finds an underlying formula for plotting the relationship between their representation of the republic and their imagination of the.

University of North Carolina mentor and scholar Louis A. Pérez, Jr. has created a singular oeuvre (On Becoming Cuban: Identity, Nationality, and Culture; The War of The United States and Cuba in History and Historiography; Winds of Change: Hurricanes and the Transformation of Nineteenth-Century Cuba; To Die in Cuba: Suicide and Society) and his recent Cuba in the American Imagination.